Flying Geese Throw Quilt: Overview

Friday, September 4, 2015

Yellow and Grey Flying Geese Quilt Done!

Welp. Another throw quilt completed! I think it's quite nice. Grey and yellow is pretty much the best.

It managed to use up some leftover quilt batting, a bunch of ancient scraps for the patchwork back, and even some leftover yellows and greys from the isosceles triangle quilt. I'm just really feeling the scrapwork quilt backs right now.

I did a simple rectangular quilting to this one, and even added in some awesome new personalized woven labels. So everyone knows who made the derned thing. Forever.

Yellow and Grey Flying Geese Quilt Done! (back)

And now, all the details:
  1. Inspiration from namoo quilt
  2. Materials for the Flying Geese Quilt
  3. How to Make 8 HSTs at once and How to Make 2 HSTs at once
  4. Assembling an HST quilt
  5. Patchwork Back from the Modern Bear Paw Quilt
  6. Quilt sandwiching instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  7. Machine quilting with standard sewing machine tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  8. Continuous bias binding instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  9. Quilt binding tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt, but mostly CluckCluckSew
  10. Alternative Mitered Edge Binding Finishing Tutorial
  11. Sweet personalized ('made by' first + last name + cold gentle machine wash symbol) woven sew-on labels from LabelsAndRibbon.com. Worth every penny. Makes it look like I know what I'm doing even though my lines aren't straight!!

Quilt Tags!
Yellow and Grey Flying Geese Quilt Done!

How To: [Another] Mitered Edge Binding Finishing

Wednesday, September 2, 2015


There's another way to finish off your quilt binding with a mitered edge. This one does not require quite as much accuracy, so it's a bit less complicated. Reducing complications is usually a good thing, especially in the homestretch of the quilt.

  1. Align Raw Edges of Double Fold Binding and Quilt
    1. Align Raw Edges of Double Fold Binding and Quilt
  2. Open Binding A Few Inches
    2. Open Binding A Few Inches
  3. Fold Left Corner of Binding Down and to the Right (forming a 90 degree triangle)
    3. Fold Left Corner of Binding Down and to the Right (forming a 90 degree triangle)
  4. Sew Single Edge of Binding Like Shown For a Few Inches
    4. Sew Single Edge of Binding Like Shown For a Few Inches
  5. After Sewing Open a Few Inches, Close Binding and Continue Sewing As Usual
    5. After Sewing Open a Few Inches, Close Binding and Continue Sewing As Usual
  6. Trim Binding End To Overlap With Pocket a Few Inches, Place End Inside Open Binding
    6. Trim Binding End To Overlap With Pocket a Few Inches, Place End Inside Open Binding
  7. Fold Binding Pocket Closed
    7. Fold Binding Pocket Closed
  8. Sew Binding Pocket Closed
    8. Sew Binding Pocket Closed
  9. Trim leftover and sew over as you do with the rest of the binding
    New Way of Finishing Mitered Binding

How To Assemble a Half Square Triangle Quilt

Sunday, August 30, 2015

Yellow & Grey Flying Geese Quilt - Progress

Once you have all the half square triangles that you need, it's time to assemble them into a quilt top! You can save yourself a lot of time by pre-arranging the quilt squares on the floor and then sort of mass-sewing them together without cutting the threads or ironing until you finish a whole row. It takes a pinch of planning, as described below, but it really did save me bunch of time when assembling my Flying Geese Throw.

  1. Determine Layout of Half Square Triangles

    1. Determine Layout of Half Square Triangles
  2. Flip Pairs of Squares Over, Along Seam Edge (organize into a pile for each column)

    2. Flip Pairs of Squares Over, Along Seam Edge (organize into a pile for each column)
  3. Sew Along Seam Edge, Not Breaking Thread In Between Pairs

    3. Sew Along Seam Edge, Not Breaking Thread In Between Pairs
  4. Keep Sewing Pairs Together, Giving Enough Thread Between To Fold Over Later

    4. Keep Sewing Pairs Together, Giving Enough Thread Between To Fold Over Later
  5. Iron Pairs, Seams Open

    5. Iron Pairs, Seams Open
  6. Sew Each Pair to the Pair Below It, Matching Up Center Seams

    6. Sew Each Pair to the Pair Below It, Matching Up Center Seams
  7. Sew a Second Column of Quilt Pairs in Similar Fashion (steps 1-6), Iron Seams Open

    7. Sew a Second Column of Quilt Pairs in Similar Fashion (steps 1-6), Iron Seams Open
  8. Sew Columns Together Matching Up Seams, Iron Open

    8. Sew Columns Together Matching Up Seams, Iron Open

HST Flying Geese Quilt Throw Step-by-Step
  1. Inspiration from namoo quilt
  2. Materials for the Flying Geese Quilt
  3. How to Make 8 HSTs at once and How to Make 2 HSTs at once
  4. Assembling an HST quilt
  5. Patchwork Back from the Modern Bear Paw Quilt
  6. Quilt sandwiching instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  7. Machine quilting with standard sewing machine tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  8. Continuous bias binding instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  9. Quilt binding tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt, but mostly CluckCluckSew
  10. Alternative Mitered Edge Binding Finishing Tutorial

I did a thing!

Friday, August 28, 2015

wut...did i just do?

You guys. I've done a thing. A really big, tremendously huge thing. And it's only now, 2 days later, just kicking in. The thing I've been working towards for seven years, and immediately slaving over for at least two, is over. Over and done.

I wouldn't even let myself think about it. I'd take my goals in small pieces of time. Smaller and smaller as it got closer. The day of I was only thinking in 15 minute chunks of time. Now I get dressed. Now I buy cookies. Now I set up my laptop. Now I give a 45 minute talk which symbolizes all I've been learning and working toward for seven years. Didn't think about the forty minutes of grilling by specifically selected experts in my field. One question at a time. One word at a time. One sip of water. It's over.

Defense Set Up
EOF.
Post Defense

Some people find it anticlimactic. Immediately afterwards, I could feel a slow warmth in my chest. The next day, I nearly cried tears of joy while waiting for an elevator. And now I'm just sort of confused. I've been waiting for the volcano to erupt, it did, but I was prepared and got through it better than expected. Now I'm left looking at my reinforcements, wondering what I'm supposed to do with them. This wall just isn't necessary any more.

I've got my PhD.

Time to get wild with some sparkling juice Chocolate cake and flowers

Flying Geese Throw: Materials

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

It's time for another quick throw quilt made of half square triangles. Half square triangles are so speedy. I'm going to go less into the step-by-steps of this quilt (as it's pretty much the same as the last one I made), but there's an additional how-to that might be handy here. Anyways, first we start with how much fabric and cut into how many half square triangles you need!

There's a tiny cat in this household who is rather fond of quilts.

Dizzy on the yellow & grey flying geese quilt throw top

You'll need...
Assuming fabric about 44" wide and a quilt that is 72"X64".
2.5 yards in accent color
2.5 yards in background color
Note: If you do the accent/background color with more than one fabric, as I did, just make sure it all adds up to approximately 2.5 yards each. Although, the fabric needs to be cut at least 5" wide (i.e., at least 1/9 yd).

You'll cut...
The 5" squares will turn into 4.5" half square triangles.
144X 5" squares in accent color
144X 5" squares in background color

Yellow & Grey Flying Geese Quilt Throw - Top - All But Closing Up the Binding
Dizzy inspects the quilt sandwich for puckers
This is how I sew all my two-at-a-time half square triangles. All together!

HST Flying Geese Quilt Throw Step-by-Step
  1. Inspiration from namoo quilt
  2. Materials for the Flying Geese Quilt
  3. How to Make 8 HSTs at once and How to Make 2 HSTs at once
  4. Assembling an HST quilt
  5. Patchwork Back from the Modern Bear Paw Quilt
  6. Quilt sandwiching instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  7. Machine quilting with standard sewing machine tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  8. Continuous bias binding instructions from the isosceles TARDIS quilt
  9. Quilt binding tips from the isosceles TARDIS quilt, but mostly CluckCluckSew
  10. Alternative Mitered Edge Binding Finishing Tutorial

How To: Create 8 Half Square Triangles at Once

Sunday, August 23, 2015

How To: Make 8 Half Square Triangles at a Time

For quilts that are made up entirely of half square triangles, you can make even more identical HSTs at once. My previous tutorial describes how to make 2 HSTs simultaneously, but I've got plans for a different quilt involving tons more of the little half square triangle buggers. This tutorial is adapted from Karen Walker's on craftsy.

  1. Cut Two Squares ((finishedSize+1")*2)
    The finishedSize is how large the square will be in the quilt. In this case, my finishedSize will be 4", but with seam allowance this tutorial will produce 4.5" squares. So, these two large squares here are 10".

    1. Cut Two Squares ((finishedSize+1)*2)
  2. Draw 2x 45 Degree Lines Across Wrong Side of One Square

    2. Draw 2x 45 Degree Lines Across Wrong Side of One Square
  3. Layer Squares, Right Sides Together

    3. Layer Squares, Right Sides Together
  4. Sew 1/4" Seam On Both Sides of Both 45 Degree Lines (4 seams)

    4. Sew 1/4" Seam On Both Sides of Both 45 Degree Lines
  5. Make 4 Cuts, Splitting the Square In Eighths
    (I like to cut horizontally, vertically, and then the two 45 degree angles last)

    5. Make 4 Cuts, Splitting the Square In Half
  6. Iron Half Square Triangles, Seams Open

    6. Iron Half Square Triangles, Seams Open
  7. Trim Half Square Triangle to Desired Size
    In this case, 4.5", because my finished size is 4", with 1/4" seam allowance on each side.

    7. Trim Half Square Triangle to Desired Finished Size
  8. Done 8 half square triangles! Keep going!
    Finished 8 Half Square Triangles

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